Monday, February 10, 2020

Today's the Day: Share Your Nonfiction Picture Book Selections Here #nf10for10


It's February 10th!!!

You know what that means....

It's time for our annual #nf10for10.

If you're looking for the place to share your nonfiction picture book selections for our #nf10for10 event, you're in the right spot.  I'm excited to be hosting this year's nonfiction picture book celebration!  Just scroll to the bottom of the post for more information, but basically you just need to leave your link in the comments below.

This is our 8th year for this nonfiction event.  I am looking forward to reading everyone's selections.

And My 2020 Selections Are...
So what does participation in #100daysofnotebooking with Michelle Hasteltine, coupled with the conversations I have been having with colleagues about supporting young writers with informational writing, and the latest blog post from Melissa Stewart about expository nonfiction text structures have me wondering?  All this has me thinking about the importance of a notebook in collecting ideas and information for nonfiction writing.  So...what are the books that might make a young writer want to grab a notebook for some informational writing?

Maybe these ten will get us started....

10 Books to Inspire Young Writers to Grab Their Notebook

Look Up!  Bird-Watching in Your Own Backyard by Annette LeBlanc Cate

This book might inspire some quiet observation outside or a bit of research to learn more.  The book's illustrations, speech bubbles, and simple collections of information are sure to inspire the information collector.  The "Bird Watching Do's and Don't's!" could easily apply to other lists of "do's and don't's."  There are several other informational organization ideas presented in the pages that are sure to bring pen to paper.

Animals by the Numbers:  A Book of Animal Infographics by Steve Jenkins

Oh, infographics.  I love them and this book does not disappoint.  Full of interesting collections of animal facts, this book is sure to inspire notebook collections.  Want to web information?  You'll find examples here.  Want to graph findings?  Yep, you'll find that too.  Want to get creative with collections?  Here's the place to start.


Mapping Sam by Joyce Hesselberth

Writers can do so much with mapping.  Want to understand a location?  Want to share your house, a park you've visited, a city, or the stars?  Well, mapping is the perfect way to do that.  Mapping Sam has maps to inspire your thinking.






The Presidents:  Portraits of History by Leah Tinari

From the author of Limitless:  24 Remarkable American Women of Vision, Grit, and Guts comes this beautifully illustrated book.  This book will inspire budding artists, fact collectors, and information enthusiasts to open their notebooks.  Grab some paints, markers, or colored pencils and get started!







Lovely Beasts:  The Surprising Truth by Kate Gardner and illustrated by Heidi Smith

For all the word collectors, Lovely Beasts is sure to get them jotting words and interesting ways to express meaning.  The author weaves words with interesting facts about these lovely beasts.





Give Bees a Chance by Bethany Barton

The end papers alone should bring out the notebooks.  The author has drawn a variety of bees with a quick fact about each.  These simple drawings and collections of information are sure to inspire young writers to start researching.  Additionally, the book is full of other interesting ways to collect information including drawings with labels, sequence of steps (in this case for how honey is made), and so much more.  Packed with possibility this book is sure to get readers to think twice about bees AND to grab their notebook.


Flying Frogs and Walking Fish by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page

Hmmm.  I wonder if I have ever had a nonfiction list that didn't include a Steve Jenkins book.  This list has two.  He's the master.  One of the things I love about his work is the interesting way he sorts and categorizes information.  This book is a great read full of the many ways animals move, but its the last pages that I'm sure will bring out the notebooks.  Jenkins and Page have quickly collected facts on different animals and the many ways they move.



Who Am I? by Tim Flach

This book is sure to inspire some quick writes in a writing notebook.  In this book, Flach shares a dozen animals that are endangered.  The book allows a quick peek at part of the animal, tells a bit about it, and then readers find out which animal was being highlighted as they turn the page.  Writers are sure to be inspired to start to collect clues for their own "Who Am I" writing.  The back of the book includes more information about why each animal is special and the reasons they have become endangered.  This one is sure to get pencils flying.



Notable Notebooks:  Scientists and Their Writing by Jessica Fries-Gaither

This book highlights different scientists and the way they used their notebooks to collect information.  So many possibilities....








The Hike by Alison Farrell

I'm taking a little liberty here.  Isn't that what these picture book events are all about?  We've all found little ways to finesse the system.  This book isn't an informational text...well unless the author has taken some autobiographical liberties.  Though it isn't informational, I think it could inspire some observational collecting in a writer's notebook.  Mandy shared this book with me as we wandered the rows at NCTE and I fell in love with it immediately.  Not only is it a great story about the delight of a hike with friends, but it also has some peeks into Wren's sketchbook at the end that are sure to inspire.


10 Nonfiction Picture Books 
In previous nonfiction events, I've shared:

Join Us
Want to join the conversation?  You're in the right place.  Just add your link in the comments below.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

It's Almost Time for our Annual Nonfiction Picture Book Celebration

Our February Nonfiction Event
Yikes!  Time flies when you're having fun!  How did we leap into February so quickly?  (I think we will leap out of February this year too.  Sorry, I love bad puns.) Mandy, our event co-conspirator shared a little sneak peek to her stack for upcoming nonfiction celebration.

Yep, the countdown is well underway.  Next week is February's Nonfiction Picture Book 10 for 10 event (#nf10for10).  I'm always amazed that this event rolls up so quickly.  It seems we flip the calendar - and boom - it's time to prepare for February's nonfiction picture book party:  #nf10for10. This year will be our 8th annual nonfiction event.  Nonfiction Picture Book 10 for 10 is the sister event for August's #pb10for10.

What is #nf10for10
In 2010 Mandy Robek and I hosted our first picture book event.  In 2013, Julie Balen suggested we add a nonfiction picture book event that worked the same.  Participants choose 10 - well, usually 10 (they're a crafty bunch) - nonfiction picture books to share.

On the day of the event, Monday, February 10th, we'll ask that you visit this blog, Reflect & Refine, to add your nonfiction link to the conversation.  
So....

Join us!

Start sorting through your collections to find your favorite titles and join us on February 10th as we each share 10 nonfiction picture books we just can't live without.  Feel free to grab the #nf10for10 button and spread the word.

I guess I better get busy.  I only have a few days to pull together my titles.  Whew!  I guess I better get busy.  

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Week One: 100 Days of Notebooking #100daysofnotebooking


"Writers collect.  They collect random inspiration - things they notice and conversations they overhear.  They collect around a single idea when beginning a project.  They also collect possibilities for revision.  They collect ideas for future projects.  And they collect bits and pieces of life that may (or may not) have significance."  
                                                        -Ruth Ayres, Enticing Hard to Reach Writers, p. 89.


It all started with a tweet....



In the age of digital, my writer's notebook has certainly been something I've neglected.  When an idea strikes, it's easy to open the blog or document where I want to write.  Going directly to drafting instead of my notebook likely leads to writing that doesn't have the depth it could have.  I suppose many ideas don't percolate long enough.  Digitally, I often use Google Keep, Voice Recorder, or my notes app to do some planning, but it still isn't the same so I've been thinking about my notebook for awhile.

Then I saw Michell's tweet.  Her tweet to took me to her post.  Her post led me to a plan.  The plan led me to a community.

So for the next 100 days I'll be opening my notebook.  I've kept my goal for this time pretty simple:  one word.  Basically all I have to do is open the book, put my pen to the paper, and get down one word.  I've even already told myself it could be adding one artifact.  It's just one.  One attempt.  Of course, I know myself well enough to know most days it will be more than that, but I know I'll need to permission to step back when I need to without giving up.  It's a notebook, it's supposed to be simple.

If you would have loved to join, but are worried you're too late, the way I see it all you have to do is write about six words to catch up.  That's just a really sentence.  Ha!  So go ahead, pull out your notebook (or go buy one), and jump in with us.